Dogs and Wildlife do not mix!
Dogs are considered unnatural predators in the Park.


Place your mouse over the speaker to hear the sound again!

Dog restriction explained on this page do not apply to guide dogs accompanying visually impaired persons or hearing ear dogs accompanying hearing-impaired persons.

Dog areas are extremely limited:
  • Dogs are not allowed on trails even if they are on a leash.
  • Dogs are not allowed in meadow areas.
  • Dogs must be on a leash, not exceed six feet in length, at all times when they are outside of your vehicle.
  • Dogs are allowed on roads and in parking areas only.
  • Dogs are not allowed on most closed roads as their status may reverts to trails! (See below for more information.)
  • Restrictions on this page do not apply to guide dogs accompanying visually impaired persons, hearing ear dogs accompanying hearing-impaired persons or service dogs accompany people in wheel chairs.
It may appear to be a great idea to give you dog a chance to get out of the city and enjoy a day in the mountains, but in reality, it is best if he is left at home. Many of the wild animals in Rocky Mountain National Park have your dog as a cousin many including the coyote consider him a natural enemy. The Rocky Mountain Big Horn Sheep, Elk and Mule Deer go to the lower altitudes to survive the harsh winds and temperatures of winter and to search for food. There, they encounter the coyote and packs of wild dogs that pursue them in an attempt to make them their lunch. Also, as they approach our homes, our dog's natural tendency is to protect his territory by barking. The Rocky Mountain Big Horn Sheep, Elk and Mule Deer associate any barking animal as a predator

When you bring your dog with you in the car, park animals know they are present and should your dog start barking or if you take him out for a walk, on a leash of course, the large mammals will within a few minutes take off for parts unknown. I've seen Rocky Mountain Big Horn Sheep and Elk stay in one place for hours until one barking dog or leashed or unleashed dog arrives. This spoils the experience for all others who come that day!

Winter Road Closures:
When Roads are closed to motor vehicles, there status changes to either "winter road status" or "winter trail status". Pets are permitted on roads converted to winter road status and NOT PERMITTED on roads converted to winter trail status.

Roads that convert to winter road status are open to pets on leashes beyond the winter gate or road closures:
  • Upper Beaver Meadows Road
  • Moraine Park Campground (closed loops)
  • Endovalley Road
  • Aspenglen Campground
  • Twin Sisters Trailhead Access Road
Roads that convert to winter trail status and are CLOSED to pets beyond winter gate or road closures:
  • Wild Basin Road
  • Glacier Basin Campground
  • Fern Lake Road
Trail Ridge Road is closed to pets from the day the road is closed for the season in autumn until the first Saturday in April. Trail Ridge Road will be open to pets as posted during the April/May period prior to vehicle access.

Old Fall River Road is closed to pets from the day the road is closed for the season in autumn until the first Saturday in April. Old Fall River Road will be open to pets as posted during spring maintenance operations.

Please leave rover at home and let all who come to the Park enjoy the wildlife!


 Previous Page… 


 Copyright © 1998-2006 Karl Snyder, All rights reserved. 

 Privacy Policy 

Updated on